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Monday, 22 July 2019 00:00

Heel pain is a rather common foot problem. The pain will usually occur under the heel, towards the front of the heel, or just behind it, where the Achilles tendon connects to the heel bone. The most common cause of heel pain is plantar fasciitis, which is pain under the heel. Other causes include arthritis, heel bursitis and bumps, tarsal tunnel syndrome, stress fractures, Sever’s disease and Achilles tendinitis. The most common remedies for heel pain are rest, proper fitting footwear and applying ice to the afflicted area. If you are experiencing some kind of heel pain, it is suggested to go see a podiatrist.

 

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr.Eji Shobowale of DeNiel Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Cypress, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Friday, 19 July 2019 00:00

Gout is a form of arthritis that can affect anyone. Schedule a visit to learn about how gout can be managed and treated.

Monday, 15 July 2019 00:00

If you have pain on the outside of your foot, you may have cuboid syndrome. The cuboid is a bone on the outer part of your foot. The ailment occurs when this bone moves out of its place. There is no concrete test for cuboid syndrome, so many times, the pain is misdiagnosed. If you have sprained your ankle before, engage in activities such as ballet or running, or have flat feet, you may be more likely to incur this condition. Luckily, this infliction is typically simple to treat. For example, you can perform exercises in order to strengthen the foot. Additionally, a doctor may be able to manipulate the foot to put the cuboid bone back in its proper location. Medical tape, orthotics, and a “cuboid wedge” could also be used to fix the placement of the bone. For relief from the discomfort, you can apply ice to your foot and rest as much as possible. If you believe you may have this condition, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr.Eji Shobowale from DeNiel Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Cypress, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 08 July 2019 00:00

Running shoes and walking shoes have very different characteristics. Runners shouldn’t run in walking shoes, as the majority of them are too stiff and do not flex the way that runners need them to. A fitness walker on the other hand can be suited for either a running or walking shoe. For them, it all comes down to analyzing both types of shoes and then determining which brand works best. Runners require extra cushioning in their shoes as they impact the ground with three times their body weight with each step. Walkers don’t require much cushioning, which is why walking shoes have less cushion than running shoes. Another difference is that running shoes have built-up heels to give the runner more spacing, whereas walking shoes have a lower heel due to the foot strike not being as significant when you walk. One final difference is the amount of flexibility each shoe offers. While runners and walkers both need shoes that have flexibility, running shoes will offer some more flexibility than walking shoes. Many shoes that are marketed as walking shoes do not flex at all. Not a lot of flexibility is given to walking shoes as it gives the user more motion control. Obtain an opinion from a podiatrist on which kind of shoe may be best for you.

For more information about walking shoes versus running shoes, consult with Dr.Eji Shobowale from DeNiel Foot & Ankle Center. Our doctor can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – Walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Cypress, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Differences between Walking and Running Shoes
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